Get This Look: Matt Damon’s Beachside Elegance

Matt Damon recently unloaded his fabulous modern Mediterranean-style home in Miami Beach, FL, and the vistas of the interior alone are like a breath of fresh air.

Photo courtesy of Luna Enterprises

Striped floors: The former den has beautiful texture with its gray undulating-striped flooring. While a natural stone floor in this pattern can be expensive, the same texture can be created with striped gray carpet tiles. At only a few dollars per square foot, carpet tiles are an easy DIY project that can add pattern, texture and warmth to any room.

Photo courtesy of Luna Enterprises

Photo courtesy of Luna Enterprises

High-contrast millwork: The bold, dark stain on the French doors and baseboards gives a potent architectural punch to the den. This look is easy to duplicate—a qualified painter can give existing millwork a handsome face-lift with a rich coat of espresso or off-black paint. The result is both dramatic and budget-friendly.

Oversize pavers: Damon’s grand villa features an enviable yard, but the beautiful path of oversize pavers has an undersize price tag. Extra-large concrete pavers—24-by-24 or larger—are available at most masonry yards for just a few dollars per square foot. They can be installed by a qualified landscaper.

Photo courtesy of Luna Enterprises

Photo courtesy of Luna Enterprises

Dramatic dining: Damon’s home has a dining space large enough to hold his 12-person table. A custom table like his can easily cost $10,000 or more.

Photo courtesy of Luna Enterprises

Photo courtesy of Luna Enterprises

You can create a fun, low-cost version for about a $100. Start with a hollow-core, flat-slab preprimed door (about 36-by-80 inches), which runs about $30 at a hardware store. Buy legs from a hardware store or big-box home store for around $10 each. Get a gallon of gray satin enamel kitchen and bathroom paint, which is designed for water resistance, for about $30. Paint several coats on the door, then add the legs to the corners. Voila: You get Damon’s stylish table at a fraction of the cost!

The silver touch: Damon’s living room furnishings cost a fortune: Custom charcoal velvet couches, a silver silk overscale rug and polished marble floors are a gorgeous monochromatic combination, but they come with a hefty price tag.

Photo courtesy of Luna Enterprises

Photo courtesy of Luna Enterprises

To get the same tone-on-tone silver vibe, try a synthetic silver rug from an online discount center, combined with gray throw pillows, mercury glass lamps and silver decorative accents from a big-box home store. Instead of marble floors—which can run $20 or more per square foot plus the cost of installation—existing hardwood floors can be restained gray by a floor refinisher and topped with a high-gloss sealant for only a few dollars per square foot.

This article was originally published by Jennifer Farrell on realtor.com

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Spooky! 6 Frightfully Fun Homes in Horror Movie Cities

The idea of settling down in an area known for its horror-filled past may seem counter-intuitive, but for some horror movie buffs, living in a legendary horror movie town is worth the potential chills.

We peered through the darkness and found six cities with reputations as iconic horror destinations.

And before we stroll further down this dark and creepy path, here is a giant disclaimer: None of the homes featured below were featured in their city’s infamous screen presence.

However, if you’re a horror fan in need of some spine-tingling inspiration, here are some starting points.

1. Washington, DC, “The Exorcist” — 2706 N St NW, $999,000

The infamous Exorcist Steps are on M Street in D.C.’s tony Georgetown neighborhood. We found a cute brick row house located just a block away.

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2. Evans City, PA, “The Night of the Living Dead” — 455 Jefferson St, $179,900

This old Colonial stands just across the creek from the Evans City cemetery. That burial ground is where the opening scenes of the iconic zombie flick were filmed in 1968.

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3. Burkittsville, MD, “The Blair Witch Project” — 212 E Main St, $169,000

Shaky hand-held camera not included. Whether you decide to venture into the nearby woods is entirely up to you.

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4. Amityville, NY, “The Amityville Horror” — 53 Bennett Pl, $975,000

This lovely home is less than a half mile away from the infamous movie address of 112 Ocean Avenue. The beautiful and welcoming facade are nothing to be afraid of.

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5. Martha’s Vineyard, MA, “Jaws” — 6 Anthiers Lane Ln, $4.495M

This mega-mansion on the east side of the posh island offers pond frontage—where it’s probably safe to go in the water.

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6. Monroeville, PA, “Dawn of the Dead” — 1259 Harvest Dr, $179,900

This modest split-level is about 15 minutes away from the Monroeville Mall. You can make a stop at Monroeville Zombies to stock up on gifts for the family.

This post was originally published by Erik Gunther on realtor.com. See it here.

9 fictional homes: What are they worth?

Finding exotic homes to lust after can be fun. Why limit your real estate envy to properties that actually exist?

© Loadmaster

What would it be like to own Hogwarts Castle, where Harry Potter learned to be a wizard, and what would it cost to buy it? What about SpongeBob SquarePants’ house, or Superman’s “Fortress of Solitude?”

© Aneurysm

Real estate website Movoto determined valuations of what content editor David Cross calls “un-real estate” — properties from television shows, movies or video games. Here are 9 make-believe homes and their real-life prices.

1. Wayne Manor

© mattbuck

© mattbuck

Value: $32.1 million

The voice-over on the 1960s “Batman” television show described it as “stately Wayne Manor,” and a role-playing game from the early 1990s provided the specs behind that description: 42,500 square feet, 11 bedrooms, 7 bathrooms, a pool, gym, library, ballroom, game room and gallery.

Cross didn’t worry about including the “bat cave” when searching for comparable properties, reasoning that Bruce Wayne might sell his home but would never part with his secret lair. But his valuation is based on the controversial assumption that Gotham City is actually Chicago, not New York.

2. SpongeBob’s abode

© Nickelodeon

© Nickelodeon

Value: $76,000

What would you pay for a modest home with a view — of the bottom of the sea?

That’s the vista SpongeBob SquarePants enjoys from his residence, which happens to be a pineapple on the ocean’s floor. Cross estimates the 238-square-inch home is located in the Republic of the Marshall Islands, where outsiders can’t buy property. So the valuation is based on what Movoto’s Mortgage Calculator estimates that SpongeBob, a fry cook at the Krusty Krab, could afford.

3. Ghostbusters’ firehouse

© Phillip Ritz

© Phillip Ritz

Value: $15.7 million

Manhattan real estate was cheaper in the 1980s, and paranormal activity in the borough wasn’t helping sellers get the best prices. But what would it cost you to buy a “Ghostbusters“-style headquarters today?

Movoto content editor Randy Nelson notes that a character in the 1984 film says the firehouse that serves as the team’s headquarters is 9,622.55 square feet. Based on comparable properties in the area, that space would sell for about $1,630 per square foot today.

Movoto estimates that the $15.7 million price tag for the property would buy you about 643 tons of marshmallows — plenty to recreate the movie’s gooey finale.

4. Hogwarts Castle

© Loadmaster

© Loadmaster

Value: $204.1 million

You can’t put a price on magic, but to estimate the value of Great Britain’s premier training facility for spell-casters, Cross says that you need three bits of information: Hogwarts’ location, its square footage and the price of comparable properties.

The location — Galloway Hills in Scotland — came via an online post. Another Harry Potter fan provided a clue to Hogwarts’ size by working out how many students would have attended the wizardry academy.

Cross decided that the whole building must measure about 414,000 square feet and that large homes — including castles — around Galloway Hills go for about $493 per square foot.

5. Fortress of Solitude

© Getty Images

© Getty Images

Value: $814 trillion

A firm handshake can be a career plus, but if you’ve got a grip that can turn lumps of coal into diamonds, you can afford a pricey retreat — even if you’re just an underpaid reporter moonlighting as an unpaid superhero.

Superman’s Fortress of Solitude is indeed expensive, not because of its location, in an Arctic wasteland, but because of its high-end building material: Kryptonian crystals.

Cross says that diamonds would be the best terrestrial stand-in, and he estimates you’d need more than 2 million of them — each the size of the $400 million Cullinan Diamond — for the dome-shaped roof.

6. Yoda’s hut

© Movoto

© Movoto

Value: $7,762

Afford it, you can.

Yoda first appears in the Star Wars movie “The Empire Strikes Back,” which finds the green Jedi master living in a spartan hut on the water-logged planet Dagobah. Movoto’s Nelson wondered what a place like that would cost if it were located in the United States, rather than in a galaxy far, far away.

He decided that swampy Morgan City, La., would be a good stand-in for Dagobah. Yoda’s residence was built of mud and the remains of his escape pod. But the average local price per square foot is $86, and Yoda’s abode is just over 90 square feet.

7. Tony Stark’s mansion

© Movoto

© Movoto

Value: $117.25 million

Tony Stark, aka Iron Man, is a billionaire genius with an ego, so you know he has a nice house.

How nice? Cross says that he based his Movoto assessment on the latest cinematic version of “Iron Man,” which had Stark living in a cliff-side mansion in Malibu, Calif. The design of the computer-generated place was based on the work of architect John Lautner, whose 25,000-square-foot Casa Marbrisa was about the right size to be Stark’s abode.

The sale of a comparable Malibu mansion yielded $3,750 per square foot, which Cross boosted to $4,690, to account for the view.

8. Fawlty Towers

© BBC

© BBC

Value: $9.94 million

After Monty Python, John Cleese starred as a hotel proprietor in the British sitcom “Fawlty Towers.” Cleese claimed his character was based on a real person, and his establishment was based on a real inn in the seaside town of Torquay, England.

Cross says that he was dying to value the property using the mini-fridge method, which assumes a hotel is worth 10,000 times the price of a soda in the hotel’s mini-bar. But Fawlty Towers didn’t offer its guests such in-room amenities. So Cross used the room-rate multiplier approach for the hotel, which has 22 guest rooms and a daily rate of 35 pounds, or $46.

9. Spencer Mansion of ‘Resident Evil’

© Capcom

© Capcom

Value: $1.75 million

Most visitors to Spencer Mansion back in the 1990s were too busy blasting away at mutants to focus on the property itself — encounters with zombie dogs can shake up your priorities like that.

But Movoto’s Nelson, a fan of the original “Resident Evil” video game, wanted to know what its setting would list for on today’s market. His research convinced him that Springfield, Mo., was the best real-world stand-in for the game’s fictional Raccoon City.

He also found that Spencer Mansion measures 10,125 square feet and that similar mansions in the Springfield area sell for about $173 per square foot.

This article was originally published by By Scot Meyer of SwitchYard Media on MSN Real Estate. See the original article here.

Which World Cup Team Has the Best Homes at Home?

Now that the 2014 FIFA World Cup is underway and the world’s soccer stars have taken their place on their sport’s grandest stage, realtor.com decided to go international in their search for lovely homes.

The World Cup competition began June 12 in Brazil, and 32 nations have put their hopes and national pride on the line. Those teams that don’t advance past the group stage will have a difficult journey back home.

Which prompts a realtor.com kind of question: Which nation would win in a battle of beautiful homes?

Realtor.com found listings for 13 of the nations participating in Brazil. If the listing had a price attached, they also included that information in U.S. dollars. Browse through the listings-which nation reigns supreme in this list of lovely houses?

France — Eaubonne, Val-d’Oise, Ile-de-France, $1.88 million.

From Realtor.com

Brazil — São Paulo, Indaiatuba.

Realtor.com

Croatia — Dubrovnik, Luksuzna vila Dubrovnik, $5.43 million.

From Realtor.com

Mexico — Mexico City, Colonia Chimalistac, Alvaro Obregon, $2.68 million.

From Realtor.com

Spain — Mallorca, Palma de Mallorca, Baleares, $27.1 million.

From Realtor.com

Chile — Santiago, Lo Barnechea.

From Realtor.com

Colombia — Rionegro, Antioquia.

From Realtor.com

Greece — Mykonos, Cyclades, $10.8 million.

From Realtor.com

Costa Rica — Playa Flamingo, Guanacaste, Casa Cielo, $3.5 million.

From Realtor.com

Italy — Siena, Toscana $63.8 million.

From Realtor.com

Switzerland — La Tour-de-Peilz, Vaud $6.49 million.

From Realtor.com

Honduras — Jonesville Point, Roatan, Islas de la Bahia, $695,262.

From realtor.com

Argentina — Luján, Buenos Aires.

From realtor.com

This article was modified from the original version published by Erik Gunther on realtor.com. To see the original article, click here

‘Ferris Bueller’ Home Sells for $1.06 Million After 5-Year Ride

Five years after it was listed for sale, a suburban Chicago home used in the film “Ferris Bueller’s Day Off” has been sold to an undisclosed buyer for $1.06 million, according to ChicagoRealEstateDaily.com.

‘Ferris Bueller’ Home Sells for $1.06 Million After 5-Year Ride

The building featured in one of the movie’s classic scenes is actually the smaller of two glass-and-steel Modernist structures on the property. It is is located about 40 feet from the 4,300-square-foot main house with four bedrooms and three bathrooms that was designed in 1953 by A. James Speyer, a protege of acclaimed architect Mies van der Rohe.

‘Ferris Bueller’ Home Sells for $1.06 Million After 5-Year Ride

‘Ferris Bueller’ Home Sells for $1.06 Million After 5-Year Ride

The secondary building seen in the film, called a “pavilion/guest house” in the listing, is a 1974 design by Speyer’s student David Haid. It has space for four cars, along with a kitchen and bathroom.

‘Ferris Bueller’ Home Sells for $1.06 Million After 5-Year Ride

The one-acre, Highland Park, IL, property was initially listed at $2.3 million in 2009, but the main home was in need of repair and its kitchen was outdated, said Craig Hogan, regional director at Coldwell Banker Previews.

‘Ferris Bueller’ Home Sells for $1.06 Million After 5-Year Ride

The 1986 John Hughes film is about high school senior Ferris Bueller, his girlfriend, and his pal Cameron, who take the day off from school for a joyride around Chicago. In the film, the secondary building is used as the garage for the 1961 Ferrari 250 GT California Spyder owned by Cameron’s dad.

It’s in that building where the teens attempt to erase evidence of their joyride by jacking up the car and running it in reverse at high speed. Calamity ensues when Cameron kicks the car off the jack, sending it smashing through the glass wall and flying out into the wooded ravine below.

‘Ferris Bueller’ Home Sells for $1.06 Million After 5-Year Ride

The film stars Matthew Broderick as Ferris Bueller and his pal Cameron is played by Alan Ruck.

Coldwell Banker agent Meladee Hughes, no relation to the film’s director, was the listing agent. Mindy Shea of @properties represented the buyer, whose identity was not disclosed.

This article was originally published by  on realtor.com. To see the original article, click here

NHL Great Claude Lemieux Sells Arizona Oasis

Chalk up a win in the real estate column for NHL legend Claude Lemieux.

from realtor.com

The retired hockey great has sold his trophy home in the Phoenix valley for $2.9 million. While that figure is south of the $3.5 million price tag Lemieux put on the home when it went on the market last March, it’s $800,000 more than what the former right winger for the Montreal Canadiens, New Jersey Devils and other teams was asking when he first listed the desert property in 2011.

from realtor.com

The home is located in Paradise Valley, AZ, roughly 30 miles east of where Lemieux played for the Phoenix Coyotes during the twilight of his career. With its standard Southwestern Tuscan-style design, the home has five bedrooms, six bathrooms and more than 7,300 square feet of living space.

from realtor.com

from realtor.com

from realtor.com

Inside, an open floor plan contains various luxury appointments and finishes, including wood-beamed ceilings, coffers, and custom built-ins and cabinetry. A chef’s kitchen has top-tier appliances, and a palatial master suite has a fireplace and spa-like bathroom with a large soaking tub.

from realtor.com

from realtor.com

Outside, the one-acre property has a covered patio, a pool and spa with a waterfall feature, and a detached guest house.

from realtor.com

from realtor.com

from realtor.com

Lemieux, 48, is an Olympic gold-medalist and one of four NHL players to hoist the Stanley Cup trophy with three different teams. He scored 379 goals and 407 assists over the course of a 21-season career with the Canadiens, Devils, Colorado Avalanche, Coyotes, Dallas Stars and the San Jose Sharks.

Sandra Baldwin of Russ Lyon Sotheby’s International Realty was the listing agent.

This article was originally published by Neal J. Leitereg on realtor.com. To see the original article and more photos, click here.

American Horror Story House for Sale

A cultural landmark popularized by the television show “American Horror Story” is back on the market in the Hancock Park neighborhood of Los Angeles.

from realtor.com

Known as the Alfred F. Rosenheim Mansion, the home made famous by Hollywood horror was built by the German-American architect of that name in 1904 and offers six bedrooms and nearly 7,600 square feet.

from realtor.com

As many viewers of the popular FX horror drama know, the three-story brick-and-stone home features handsome wood-trim finishes, Tiffany glass windows and period-style light fixtures and ceilings.

from realtor.com

from realtor.com

from realtor.com

from realtor.com

It has a sunroom, a basement with a hidden room and a converted chapel that now houses a ballroom, a recording studio and a car collection.

from realtor.com

from realtor.com

The historic horror story home has gone on and off the market a number of times over the last few years. The property was shopped for as much as $17 million in early 2012, but saw its price slashed by $11 million later on that year. This time around, the Rosenheim Mansion has relisted for the tidy sum of $7.85 million.

from realtor.com

Dana Brockway of Coldwell Banker has the listing.

Article originally by Neal J. Leitereg on realtor.com. For more photos and article source, click here.