It’s Eclectic! The Easy New Way to Decorate If You Like to Break the Rules

Richard Powers/ArcaidImages/Getty Images

We all gravitate toward certain decor schemes, whether it’s Mid-Century Modern, glam, traditional, or even Joanna Gaines-inspired farmhouse chic.

But what if you can’t be pinned down to just one look?

If you detest anything matchy-matchy and love to break a few rules when it comes to your decor, we’ve got good news: You’ve already got a good start on the fun and funky trend known as eclectic style. This decor option offers you a blank check to reject more traditional looks in favor of loosely arranging your assortment from different places and time periods.

“Eclectic style is definitely real—it’s literally a combination of a variety of looks that don’t necessarily match, but that certainly coordinate,” explains Justin Riordan, of Spade and Archer Design Agency.

Think: bold pops of color, a Mid-Century couch, and a couple of antique chairs. The look is casual, earth-friendly—and it’s riding a wave of popularity.

“With the influx in environmental design of late, we’re seeing the reuse of older furniture and buildings that mix new pieces and additions,” he explains.

And if you’re working on a budget (and frankly, who isn’t?), eclectic style fits the bill nicely, notes Beverly Solomon of the eponymous design firm. “This theme allows you to put together interesting and affordable art and decor that reflects your view and personality,” she says.

Origins of eclectic style

The eclectic look is hardly new. Even though it’s in the spotlight these days, eclecticism actually came about in the early 1900s, with the Arts and Crafts movement. “It became hip for progressives and thinkers to fit art and furnishings into their homes to achieve a more personal feeling, rather than one particular style,” Solomon explains.

Sounds familiar, right? Today’s homeowners are once again turning to eclectic style to show off a distinctive touch to their decor.

Just beware: Eclectic decor might allow you to break some rules, but it isn’t a totally lawless design scheme. If this style speaks to you, read on for how to make it work in your home—without veering into tacky territory.

Eclectic style embraces bold colors

Sure, we’ve long been told that a room’s colors should be cohesive. But with eclectic style, your shades can skew bold and bright.

“Don’t be shy about mixing yellow, pinks, emerald greens, reds and bright blues,” says Lisa Conley of 27 Diamonds Interior Design in Orange County, CA.

To pull it all together, use a neutral base, like white or a quiet gray, adds Barbara McInnis Hayman, owner of Decorating Den Interiors in Pottstown, PA. “If the look seems too ‘quiet,’ choose any signature accent hue for a pop of color.”

Use a variety of furniture styles

There’s no single line of eclectic furniture. (That would defeat the point, right?) But you can achieve the look by borrowing from a couple of styles—or just use a mismatch of things you already own, Riordan suggests.

“You could try a contemporary sofa with a Victorian table, modern lamps, and a Hudson River Valley-style painting,” he says.

Conley especially likes to combine Mid-Century Modern and shabby chic pieces. These pieces aren’t from the same time period, but if you consider scale and composition, the furniture placement will look intentional—and tell a story.

For instance, try using different kinds of chairs around the dining table. They don’t have to match, but they should have at least one aspect that ties them together—maybe they’re all rounded at the top or they’re roughly the same size.

Accessorize with flair

Here’s your chance to make your mark with eclectic style on the cheap: Pile on the pillows, hang up a funky wall gallery, create a jungle of succulents, or stack art books to use as side tables.

“Or you could hang collages that mix mirrors, art, and photos,” Conley adds.

Incorporate details from your travels or anything that speaks to you—eclectic style is highly personal.

Showcase a riot of texture and pattern

Not enough oomph from those accent pillows? Go wild with your look, by layering patterns.

“You might combine a geometric fabric with a textured solid, or a smooth, silky fabric with a patterned piece,” says Hayman.

But don’t go too crazy with stripes upon stripes, plus polka dots and plaids. Keep one thing solid, like the wall color shown above. This quiet, deep teal mixes nicely with the patterns in the rug and chairs.

Work toward balance when you approach eclectic style, Riordan urges. Each room should have old and new, dark and light, small items and big, without becoming overwhelming.

“The point of this look is to make the space easier to live in and live with,” he says. “It’s a home, not a theme park.”

Toe the line between ‘eclectic’ and ‘ewww’

Eclectic homeowners must edit ruthlessly, lest their rooms run amok. One huge sign, like the one above, is fine—but no more.

“The challenge here is to create a pleasant melting pot of elements, not a Balkan massacre,” Solomon says.

One way to know whether you’ve crossed the line with your decor scheme is by taking note of how friends and family react.

“Is there a look of horror when people enter your living room, or do you receive sincere compliments on your mix-and-match design?” asks Solomon.

Another sign is your ability to maintain the look. If you’ve got too much stuff everywhere, you’ll spend hours stacking books and layering throw pillows.

Instead, consider each new piece and decide whether it’ll enhance your look or ignite a hot mess. In the end, you want a room that’s carefully curated, not cluttered and chaotic.

 

Posted by Jennifer Geddes on realtor.com

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5 Home Design Trends for 2018 (and 3 Fads That Need to Go )

Thought that all-white kitchen was timeless? Think again.

Home design trends come and go — and in 2018, one look that’s on its way out could actually cause your home to sell for less.

Here’s a look at five design trends you’ll be seeing more of in 2018, and three it’s time to kiss goodbye (especially if one of your New Year’s resolutions is to sell your home).

Trending in 2018

Floral prints

Interior design experts predict floral prints in bold, contrasting colors will make a big comeback in 2018, particularly on large billowing fabrics, like drapery, as well as chairs and throw pillows.

Photo courtesy of DwellStudio via Instagram.

Statement floors

Forget statement walls — 2018 will be about statement floors. From bold colored geometric tiles to soft herringbone-style hardwoods, expect to see fab floors everywhere next year, especially in bathrooms and laundry rooms. They’re a great way to make a small room pop, without adding clutter.

Photo from Zillow listing.

Light wood cabinets

Homeowners are gravitating toward medium and light wood cabinets, particularly with flat fronts and clean lines. The warmth, texture and natural element wood cabinets add help make the space feel more inviting.

Photo from Zillow listing.

Warm neutrals

From warm reds to caramel browns to soft beige, moodier color palettes, both on walls and in artwork, will be popular in 2018.

Photo courtesy of Adam Ford (The Happy Tudor) via Instagram.

Matte metal hardware

What kind of drawer pulls and light fixtures do you want with those wood cabinets? Matte metal! Homeowners are moving away from shiny silver- or gold-accented kitchen hardware — they can make the space feel cold.

Photo from Zillow listing.

2017 fads to forget

All-white kitchens

This look has been popular for a while, but it’s on the way out, according to the Zillow Home Trend Forecast.

Expect to see more color in kitchens next year, especially if the homeowner is planning to sell. Zillow data shows homes with blue kitchens sell for $1,800 more than homes with white kitchens.

Adding color and texture in the kitchen can help make the space feel more inviting. “While homes with all-white kitchens can be beautiful in photos, they are hard to keep clean and they may sell for less money,” says Zillow home design expert Kerrie Kelly.

Beautiful kitchen having electrical automatic cooking gas and fruits, flowers kept on table

You’ll see designers and bloggers painting their kitchen islands navy blue or deep red (maybe even purple!) or using white countertops to contrast with medium or light wood cabinets.

Bar carts

While perfectly staged bar carts look beautiful, most people don’t use theirs every day. Instead, the carts take up space and collect dust.

But don’t get rid of your cart just yet! Experts predict a shift toward coffee carts, which can be equally trendy, but far more practical.

Succulents

Succulents are easy to care for and relatively affordable, but so many other vibrant indoor plant options are out there. Nobody’s saying to toss out your beloved Haworthia, but do consider incorporating other plant varieties into your home — perhaps a palm or hearty fiddle-leaf fig.

Haworthia Fasciata Sitting Near Window; Shutterstock ID 167096096; PO: Cat Overman; Job: blog post

 

Posted by Cat Overman on Zillow

5 Holiday Looks on the Nice List

Festive ideas for decking your halls this season, straight from the source.

If Santa’s decor has been on the top of your wishlist ever since he claimed his home on Zillow, now you can make it happen. We highlighted five ways you can easily incorporate his holiday style into your home.

 

 

Posted by Renee Meininger on Zillow

8 Home Improvement Hacks From the Humble Dollar Store

Want some home improvement ideas on the cheap? How about the crazy cheap? Whether you want to spruce up the garden or streamline your closet, there are plenty of insanely clever creations that hail from the humble aisles of your local dollar store. Check out these simple DIY hacks that can transform a space—and best of all, no one will ever guess where they’re from.

Reflect your good taste

Build this work of art to be as “compact” or grand as you like. Thistlewood Farms

Anyone who’s priced wall decor knows it doesn’t come cheap. But, as KariAnne Wood of Thistlewood Farms points out, there’s no need to go broke when you can build a beautiful focal point all on your own.

This stylish mirror, made with dollar store compacts, set this DIY-er back a mere $19. Not too shabby!

Drip-dry boot trays

Simple stones make a great boot tray. Dollar Store Crafts

In lieu of throwing down a pile of dish towels to dry up puddles left behind by soggy boots, consider a simple tray and a bag of stones.

Heather Mann of Dollar Store Crafts decided this river rock boot tray was a more elegant addition to the entryway. We couldn’t agree more. Give your regular doormat the day off.

Grow an indoor greenhouse

This simple project will add a pop of color to your home in no time. The Wicker House

If you crave a little bit of nature indoors, this greenhouse terrarium should satisfy your green thumb.

Emily Sweeten of The Wicker House made this picture-perfect piece with picture frames from the dollar store. She put it together in no time, though she admits, it helped to have another pair of hands to construct the rooftop.

Posh spice rack

If you’re really good, you’ll alphabetize them.The Stonybook House

Want to free up some coveted cabinet space? Lori Leeper at the Stonybrook House was inspired to create this back-of-the-door spice rack, made from dollar store cooling racks.

Fresh herbs flourish at your fingertips

 

Parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme—all within reach in your kitchen. Vanessa Brady

Want an innovative wall hanging that doubles as your very own produce aisle?

Vanessa Brady of Tried & True and her sister, Adriana, shared this Minimal Modern Herb Garden, which, depending on size, might cost you less than a bunch of fresh cilantro from the market, thanks to galvanized tubs priced at $1 a piece.

Tea for two … birds

Your backyard just got a bit more beautiful thanks to this oasis for your feathered friends. Morena’s Corner

Morena Hockley of Morena’s Corner added a little Mad Hatter’s tea party influence to her garden when she built this teapot birdbath with cups, saucers, plates, and, of course, a teapot she found at her local Goodwill (but dollar store housewares work just as well). Go ahead and spray-paint your creation to match your outdoor decor.

Keep the bugs at bay the natural way

Bug repellent never looked so good. A Little Claireification

If you’re sick of your outings reeking of citronella, consider this natural and cost-effective way to repel pests.

These Mason jar luminaries, designed by Claire of A Little Claireification, offer a chemical-free alternative to those pungent candles and sprays. Plus, they make attractive centerpieces.

Just grab a few rosemary sprigs, along with cedarwood, lavender, and lemon essential oils (or the real thing), which Claire says will make your gatherings bug-free.

Thumbs-up for word art

Nothing “tacky” about thumbtack art! DIY Ready

Want to make a statement, literally?

Lisa Loperfido of DIYReady notes that this thumbtack word artproject costs just $3. Spell your way to stunning decor for only pennies.

Posted by Liz Alterman on realtor.com

 

 

 

3 Design Tricks That Will Make Your Small Space Feel Big

With tiny homes and personal decluttering trends taking the world by storm, many people are learning to do more with less.

Do you have a small space in your home that you’re unsure what to do with? Or is your cramped apartment forcing you to be creative in your living arrangements? You’re not alone.

Make your small room or living area fit your needs with clever solutions that will streamline your life and maximize your space.

Paint can work wonders

Choosing the right paint color for your small room can instantly give the impression of more space or emphasize its cozy feel. Traditional neutrals like white, cream and light gray are great choices because they provide a clean and streamlined look, while making the room feel brighter and more expansive.

Painting the ceiling white to draw the eye upward is an easy way to create visual openness overhead. You’ll have an airy and inviting space in no time.

Courtesy of Orlando Soria.

On the other hand, if you want to play up the small space vibe even more, go bold with dark colors. It’s a fun and unique design choice to emphasize the smallness of a room by making a cozy den-like atmosphere with colors like black, dark gray and navy.

Courtesy of Allison Lind.

Whether you decide to go light or dark, adding paint to your small space will help you get the effect you are going for in a quick and budget-friendly way.

Savvy storage

With tight spaces, there isn’t always room for all the storage needed for belongings, clothing, office supplies and more. By incorporating creative and flexible storage solutions, you can easily keep clutter out of sight, while still keeping everything you need handy.

For example, the kitchen is a great place to implement clever storage. Roll-away islands and pantries create an adjustable cooking area to fit your needs.

Courtesy of Sandra Bird.

Add storage by using the space beneath your cabinets for hanging spices or wine glasses, and attaching holders to the backs of cabinet doors to keep foil and cleaning supplies neatly out of sight.

Don’t forget about uncommon spaces like ceilings for hanging items like bicycles out of the way, or adding shelving high up in closets for rarely used items.

Multi-tasking furniture

When you have limited floor space, it’s important to make your furniture work double duty. Choose pieces that have hidden storage and multiple functions, or can be compacted and stored when not in use.

Photo from Zillow listing.

If you can’t fit a dresser in your bedroom, try using drawers or crates under the bed for clothing and extra linens. A pouf or leather ottoman can easily transition from a seat to a footrest or side table.

Add function to your entryway by employing a bench with storage inside to hide extra shoes, gloves, and scarves. And if you have wall space to spare, hang a fold-down dining table.

Photo from Zillow listing.

Using modular pieces that can serve different purposes or fold out of the way frees up room to make your space comfortable and livable for you and your guests.

Limited square footage doesn’t mean you have to sacrifice function and style. Small space living is a great way to lead a simplified and streamlined life. With creative thinking, you can go from a cluttered, cramped mess to an organized and inviting space with room for all.

Posted by Erica Sooter on Zillow

5 Retro Decorating Trends That Deserve a Comeback

If you’ve been yearning for the return of the conversation pit, you’re not alone.

Some home decor looks are just too good to let go. The boldly colored kitchen cabinets of the ’50s are taking on a sophisticated modern look. The late ’80s country kitchen look is enjoying new life — minus the gingham frills and bonneted goose motif — in today’s farmhouse chic trend, and mid-century design has taken over the home furnishing offerings of retailers at every price point. Rattan furniture and velvet upholstery, both popular in the ’70s, are showing up in designer collections again.

Our pick for the decor trend  most deserving of a second chance? The brightly colored bathroom fixtures (and sometimes even matching tile) that became popular beginning in the 1930s, and evolved from cool pastels to the much-maligned avocado and harvest gold hues of the 1970s. We’re not seeing these offered new yet, but salvage stores are a great resource if you simply must have a mint green or bubble-gum pink sink for your bathroom renovation.

Photo from Zillow listing.

Here are some of the blast-from-the-past home decor looks designers are happy to have deja vu over.

’50s-style dens

We are loving the reemergence of the den or the basement as a gathering space. Instead of having family and friends centered around a 50-inch television in the living room, we’re seeing people move toward intimate areas like listening rooms for their favorite vinyls, or casual seating in the den with headphones and their iPads. This setup is more conducive for connecting and catching up, or simply taking time for one’s self — think wood paneling, updated and re-imagined bean bags in designer fabrics, and high-quality retro audio sound.

– Kerrie Kelly, Kerrie Kelly Design Lab

Photo by Brian Kellogg.

Macrame textile art

Macrame from the ’60s and ’70s, but with a whole new twist. I love the beautiful heavy knotted textile hangings as art, or the thin delicate hangings for room screens. [They can hold] hanging flower vases and even light fixtures. This time it’s all about texture with a Scandinavian vibe.

– Susan M. Jamieson, ASID, Bridget Beari Designs, Inc.

Big macrame on a white brick wall in bedroom; Shutterstock ID 671446057; PO: Cat Overman; Job: blog post

Conversation pits

We want big living rooms with circular, sunken conversation pits. They need custom built-in sofas, space-age floating fireplaces hanging in the middle, and plush shag carpeting deep enough to swallow your foot. Give us this dedicated zone for hanging out with friends and family, a space that isn’t centered around a TV screen. Give us bold colors and wild graphic patterns on pillows. And, most importantly, give us a live-in housekeeper, because those shag carpets are a nightmare to keep clean.

– Chris Stout-Hazard, ROGER+CHRIS

Photo from Zillow listing.

The home design trend from the past I’d love to see make a comeback is the conversation pit. Our technology age has created a digital life and physical separation. The classic conversation pit promotes togetherness and community. The conversational pit arrangement organically encourages people to face each other with comfortable deep seating. It also can be an advantage in design strategy, with a flexibility to promote a stylish streamlined modern feel or a casual bohemian aesthetic. Inspiring our clients to ditch the television and engage with family and friends is part of our design practice, creating space as experience.

– Elena Frampton, Frampton Co.

Timelessly practical kitchen features

Two of our favorite features making a comeback lately are banquette seating and library ladders, especially in the kitchen. A lot of our projects are in the city, where space is at a premium. Banquette seating works great in a tight space, plus it creates additional storage opportunities under the bench. Same goes for the ladder: It’s all about space. If you don’t have to haul out a clunky ladder to access everything out of reach, you can double your kitchen’s storage capacity with cabinets or shelves that go all the way up to the ceiling.

– Jeff Pelletier,  Board & Vellum

Photo from Zillow listing.

Brass hardware and fixtures

Used in smaller doses like pull handles and faucets with a more sleek and modern shape, [brass hardware and fixtures] can really up your design game in a cool classy way. My favorite bathroom look right now is dark navy cabinets with Carrera marble quartz counters, oversized white sinks, and printed cement floor tile incorporated with brass pull handles and faucets.

– Christina El Moussa, HGTV’s “Flip or Flop” and SuccessPath

Photo from Zillow listing.

 

Posted by Cat Overman on Zillow

3 High-Impact Spots to Use Bold Color

Don’t hold back — bright, bold colors are on trend and easier to incorporate than you might think.

The next two years are all about the big, the bold, and the beautiful. While neutrals and metallics will always dominate interior color palettes, the new color trends are paving the way for a rise in fearless accents.

Adding pops of color to your home doesn’t have to be a daring feat. Bold hues in a few unique places make a world of difference. Whether it’s a new front door color or a festive case good, let’s dive into a few unexpected ways to use bold color.

Daring details

Subtle yet significant architectural details — like baseboard trim, molding, and wainscoting — are hidden gems when it comes to adding color in unexpected places.

A move as simple as swapping out a neutral trim for a bold, lacquered shade turns even the tiniest space into a prominent focal point. A new color on the old staircase railing stirs instant conversation with visiting guests, while a bright fireplace mantle breathes in new life.

Don’t forget your home’s exterior: Unique details like brackets, corbels, and hidden soffits are perfect places to add a fun, unexpected color pop. Spring gardening DIY calling your name? Shutters and built-in window planters are easy projects, and great candidates for your favorite fab shade.

A colorful front door sets the tone for visitors entering your home. Photo from Zillow listing

Go bold in the bathroom and kitchen

Tubs and sinks — who would ever think that the workhorses of the bathroom and kitchen could be prime real estate for a new splash of color? While avocado-green kitchen sinks are a thing of the past, modern counterparts are taking over the design realm in fun, bold shades.

For a DIY route, paint the underside of a farmhouse-style, wall-mounted sink or vintage clawfoot tub for a fun take on an old classic. Go for tubs and sinks that have lips — they make the new color application look seamless.

A deep egglant tub anchors an otherwise light and bright bathroom. Photo from Zillow listing

Color and case goods

What better way to add an unexpected hue in your space than with a custom case good? Case goods are extremely versatile — use them as a buffet in the dining room, a console in the entry, a dresser in the bedroom, or even a chest in the living room.

While most furniture pieces feature a beautiful, natural stain or a neutral shade, customizing a case good with a vivid hue is a sure way to turn that piece into a showstopper.

If a new case good isn’t in your future, a fresh coat of paint and some fun hardware on a well-loved piece is an easy way to bring new life into an unexpected place. Have fun with an emerald-green buffet in the dining room or a coral console for a festive entrance — whatever shade you choose, it’ll be a unique piece.

Matching aqua chests add a lively touch while providing handy storage. Photo courtesy of The Design Firm

Posted by Kerrie Kelly on Zillow