61% of First-Time Buyers Put Down Less than 6%

According to the National Association of Realtors’ latest Realtors Confidence Index, 61% of first-time homebuyers purchased their homes with down payments below 6% from October 2016 through November 2017.

Many potential homebuyers believe that a 20% down payment is necessary to buy a home and have disqualified themselves without even trying. The median down payment for all buyers in 2017 was just 10% and that percentage drops to 6% for first-time buyers.

Zillow Senior Economist Aaron Terrazas’ recent comments shed light on why buyer demand has remained strong,

“Looking into 2018, rent is expected to continue gaining. More widespread rent growth could mean home buying demands stay high, as renters who can afford it move away from the unpredictability of rising rents toward the relative stability of a monthly mortgage payment instead.”

It’s no surprise that with rents rising, more and more first-time buyers are taking advantage of low-down-payment mortgage options to secure their monthly housing costs and finally attain their dream homes.

Bottom Line

If you are one of the many first-time buyers who is not sure if you would qualify for a low-down payment mortgage, let’s get together and set you on your path to homeownership!

 

Posted by The KCM Crew

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Why You Should Still Talk to a Lender Even If You’re Not Ready to Buy a Home

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If you’re a first-time home buyer, you might think you’re not ready to purchase a house. Perhaps you’re concerned about your job situation, your previous credit history, or your high monthly expenses. Whatever the circumstances, every borrower and financial situation is unique.

Unless you’re a financial expert, it’s best not to self-diagnose your financial problems. You wouldn’t skip out on the dentist to fill your own cavities, so don’t try to solve your financial troubles yourself either. A loan officer can walk you through your options—and they won’t try to drill your teeth!

When you apply for home loans, mortgage loan officers look at your credit score, credit history, monthly liabilities, income, and assets. These officers see the entire financial picture, not just the investable funds. A reputable loan officer with experience can get you on the right track for buying a home.

Here are three common reasons people don’t want to apply for a mortgage and what you should do if you’re really serious about buying a home.

A less-than-ideal credit report

The reality is that mortgage companies are required to pull a copy of your credit report, which includes scores from all three credit reporting bureaus. Your credit report is the most accurate representation of your credit available. Don’t let your messy credit report keep you from talking to a lender. After looking at your credit report, the lender can actually tell you what debts are the biggest drain on your borrowing power so you can start making smart financial decisions to improve your score.

Not enough income

Let the mortgage company review your pay stubs, W-2s, and tax returns for the last two years. If you were self-employed, let the loan officer look at your tax returns and evaluate your credit to determine what down payment you can afford and what you can buy. The lender can give you an idea of what you need to do to qualify, including how much more money you need to make to offset a proposed mortgage payment. With an action plan and a strategy in place, it may just take you a matter of months to button up your financial picture to qualify.

Too much debt

Debt and liabilities definitely impact spending power. Every dollar of debt you have requires two dollars of income to offset it. So for example, if you have a car loan that’s $500 a month, you will need $1,000 a month of income to offset that monthly liability. If more than 15% of your income currently goes toward consumer debt, you’ll have to either pay off debt or get more income—perhaps via a cosigner—to qualify for mortgage financing. Again, let the lender look at your financial picture so they can tell you what it takes to make it work.

If you’re planning to buy a house in the future but aren’t financially ready, talk to a professional. Meet with them face-to-face, provide them with all of your financial documentation, let them run a copy of your credit report, and go through a pre-home buying consultation so they can either pre-approve you or tell you what to do to become pre-approved in the future.

Many times, potential buyers are not ready, but having a conversation with a professional—so you know where you stand and where you are going—can be tremendously beneficial. You can also take a look at your financial health with a free credit report from Credit.com.

 

Posted on realtor.com

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First Time Homeowner? Here’s The Move-In Checklist That Will Save You Stress

Congratulations on your new home! The process can be exciting – but also very stressful. And that’s just the process of buying a home. After the closing, you will probably find you have even more tasks to deal with.

Here’s a short homeowner move-in checklist of things you should make sure you do to smooth over the process. You’ll be surprised at how much easier this makes the moving process.

Start By Taking Time Off From Work

The first week or two in your new place will likely be a mess of repairs, phone calls, unpacking, and of course waiting. Waiting for contractors, internet and phone and cable installers, and deliveries.

Trying to work this in alongside your job is not a good idea. Remember, you just bought yourself a house. This is a big deal! And not something you will do often. Give yourself a break and take some personal or vacation days.

Do As Many Repairs And Improvements As Possible Prior To Moving In

It doesn’t matter whether you’re hiring a pro or doing it yourself. It’s much easier to work on a house when it’s empty. This is particularly true for projects that are best done when there’s no furniture in the way, like refinishing floors, plastering, or painting. I recommend using HomeZada to plan and manage your remodeling projects to prevent them from going over budget.

You should probably do basic tasks like using a multimeter to check the whole electrical system to find out if it needs a repair project. And we would strongly recommend removing the new paint smell before the move. In new construction, new paint can especially can be a bit much.

Set Up Utilities And Change Your Address

To begin with, let the post office know you’ve moved, so that they can start forwarding mail to your new home. Try to start updating your address on all your key bank and workplace benefits accounts, your credit cards, your health and car insurance. Next update your information on your memberships and magazine subscriptions.

At the same time, call the electric and gas companies to let them know you’ve moved. Most will just transfer over your account to the new address.  If you are moving in the same neighborhood or service area, you need to also do the same with your internet or cable provider. If you’re moving outside your region, you’ll want to investigate the local options and call them to set up service when you get settled.

Clean Up (Or Hire Someone)

Before the furniture shows up and you start unpacking, it’s time to clean like crazy. Ideally, you’d hire a house cleaner who can do a one-off deep clean of the house.

You don’t need to be obsessed about cleanliness to see how difficult it is to live in someone else’s mess. This means wash and vacuum carpets (if need be, rent a carpet cleaner or hire out), mop and sweep the floors, bleach the bathroom, clean the bathtub, clean the oven and fridge and sinks, and wipe off all the closets, shelves, drawers, and cabinets.

Have The Locks Changed

Even if you trust the last owner, it’s impossible to say how many house key copies are floating around or who might have them. A new set of door hardware will only cost around $50, and it’s worth the peace of mind. The hardware store will also be happy to make up a few extra copies of your new key for you to give to a trusted neighbor, friend, or relative.

Locate Your Shut-Off Valves

First, there are shut off valves to help deal with smaller, local problems. If the toilet starts overflowing, find the valve that comes out of the floor or sticks out of the wall just under or behind the toilet. If your sink starts leaking uncontrollably, there’s a shut-off under the sink. Similarly, there’s a gas shut off near the dryer or stove. Find all of these and get some familiarity with using them.

Then, and this is crucial, find the main shut-offs. These control the water and gas as it comes into your house from the street. You need to locate these so you don’t have to panic about a busted pipe that’s flooding your kitchen. Similarly, familiarize yourself with the circuit breakers. Different circuits control the electricity to different rooms or different appliances. Notice the main shut off switch is, which can turn off all power to your house in the event of an emergency.

Conclusion

Of course, there are plenty of other things you’ll need to take care of as part of your move — like going to a furniture store or throwing a housewarming party. However, this brief checklist is a good place to start for the most important things you definitely don’t want to forget.

Posted on HomeZada

 

Home Buying Myths Slayed [INFOGRAPHIC]

Some Highlights:

  • Interest rates are still below historic numbers.
  • 88% of property managers raised their rent in the last 12 months!
  • The credit score requirements for mortgage approval continue to fall.

Posted by The KCM Crew