The Net Worth of a Homeowner is 44x Greater Than A Renter!

Every three years, the Federal Reserve conducts their Survey of Consumer Finances in which they collect data across all economic and social groups. Their latest survey data, covering 2013-2016 was recently released.

The study revealed that the median net worth of a homeowner was $231,400 – a 15% increase since 2013. At the same time, the median net worth of renters decreased by 5% ($5,200 today compared to $5,500 in 2013).

These numbers reveal that the net worth of a homeowner is over 44 times greater than that of a renter.

Owning a home is a great way to build family wealth

As we’ve said before, simply put, homeownership is a form of ‘forced savings.’ Every time you pay your mortgage, you are contributing to your net worth by increasing the equity in your home.

That is why, for the fifth year in a row, Gallup reported that Americans picked real estate as the best long-term investment. This year’s results showed that 34% of Americans chose real estate, followed by stocks at 26% and then gold, savings accounts/CDs, or bonds.

Greater equity in your home gives you options

If you want to find out how you can use the increased equity in your home to move to a home that better fits your current lifestyle, let’s get together to discuss the process.

 

Posted by The KCM Crew

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5 Reasons Homeownership Makes ‘Cents’

The American Dream of homeownership is alive and well. Recent reports show that the US homeownership rate has rebounded from recent lows and is headed in the right direction. The personal reasons to own differ for each buyer, but there are many basic similarities.

Today we want to talk about the top 5 financial reasons you should own your own home.

  1. Homeownership is a form of forced savings – Paying your mortgage each month allows you to build equity in your home that you can tap into later in life for renovations, to pay off high-interest credit card debt, or even send a child to college. As a renter, you guarantee that your landlord is the person with that equity.
  2. Homeownership provides tax savings – One way to save on taxes is to own your own home. You may be able to deduct your mortgage interest, property taxes, and profits from selling your home, but make sure to always check with your accountant first to find out which tax advantages apply to you in your area.
  3. Homeownership allows you to lock in your monthly housing cost – When you purchase your home with a fixed-rate mortgage, you lock in your monthly housing cost for the next 5, 15, or 30 years. Interest rates have remained around 4% all year, marking some of the lowest rates in history. The value of your home will continue to rise with inflation, but your monthly costs will not.
  4. Buying a home is cheaper than renting – According to the latest report from Trulia, it is now 37.4% less expensive to buy a home of your own than to rent in the US. That number varies throughout the country but ranges from 6% cheaper in San Jose, CA to 57% cheaper in Detroit, MI.
  5. No other investment lets you live inside of it – You can choose to invest your money in gold or the stock market, but you will still need somewhere to live. In a home that you own, you can wake up every morning knowing that your investment is gaining value while providing you a safe place to live.

Bottom Line

Before you sign another lease, let’s get together to help you better understand all your options.

 

Posted by The KCM Crew

Report: Homeownership Is a Precondition of the American Dream

Hearth just released their 2017 State of the American Dream report which showed that Americans still see homeownership as an integral piece of the American Dream. The report confirmed that “all generations–including millennials–agree homeownership is very important to achieving the American Dream.

Americans ranked “owning a home I love” higher than any other options (including “starting a family” and “finding a fulfilling career”) as an important part of the American Dream.

Despite some claims that homeownership’s importance to the American Dream is in decline, the report found that the dream of homeownership remains strong.

Of Americans who said they think achieving the American Dream is important, 70% think homeownership is important to the dream, and 41% think homeownership is very important to the dream.

What about Millennials?

Hearth addresses the desires of millennials by explaining:

“Contrary to popular opinion, millennials who want to achieve the American Dream are 5% more likely than Baby Boomers to think homeownership is important. And two-thirds of millennial renters view homeownership as important to the American Dream.

Although millennials are often portrayed as fickle and transient, they actually seek the stability of homeownership even more than their parents.”

Other Key Findings from the Report:

  • Homeowners are 126% more likely than non-homeowners to view homeownership as a way to build wealth. Nevertheless, homeowners still overwhelmingly associated homeownership with a family living space.
  • Homeowners are 24% more likely than non-homeowners to see homeownership as an achievement that reflects hard work.
  • Millennials are 77% more likely than baby boomers to see a home primarily as a way to build wealth.
  • Baby boomers are 98% more likely than millennials to see a home as a way to pass wealth down to children or family.
  • Millennials are 29% more likely than baby boomers to see a home as an achievement that reflects hard work–an outcome we expected given that many millennials are still working hard to afford their first homes.

Bottom Line

The report concluded:

“This survey revealed a powerful finding: Across demographic groups, homeownership remains a precondition of the American Dream.”

Posted by The KCM Crew

The 5 Greatest Benefits of Homeownership

Recently, Freddie Mac reported on the benefits of homeownership. According to their report, here are the five benefits that “should be at the top of everyone’s list.”

  1. Homeownership can help you build equity over time.
  2. Your monthly payments will remain stable.
  3. You may have some tax benefits.
  4. You can take pride in ownership.
  5. Homeownership improves your community.

Let’s expand on each of Freddie Mac’s points:

Homeownership can help you build equity over time.

Every three years, the Federal Reserve conducts a Survey of Consumer Finances in which they collect data across all economic and social groups. The latest survey, which includes data from 2010-2013, reports that a homeowner’s net worth is 36 times greater than that of a renter ($194,500 vs. $5,400).

In a Forbes article, the National Association of Realtors’ (NAR) Chief Economist Lawrence Yun reported that now the net worth gap is 45 times greater.

Your monthly payments will remain stable.

When you purchase a home with a fixed rate mortgage, the majority of the payment (principle and interest) remain constant. On the other hand, rents continue to skyrocket. Your housing expense is much more stable if you own instead of rent.

You may have some tax benefits.

According to the Tax Policy Center’s Briefing Book -“A citizen’s guide to the fascinating (though often complex) elements of the federal Tax System” – there are several tax advantages to homeownership.

Here are four items from the Briefing Book:

  • Mortgage Interest Deduction
  • Property Tax Deduction
  • Imputed Rent
  • Profits from Home Sale

You can take pride in ownership.

Most surveys show that a major factor in purchasing a home is the freedom you have to design the home the way you want. From paint colors to yard accessories, you don’t need a landlord’s permission to make the house feel like a home.

Homeownership improves your community.

The National Association of Realtors recently released a study titled ‘Social Benefits of Homeownership and Stable Housing.’ The study explained:

“Homeownership does create social capital and provide residents with a platform from which to connect and interact with neighbors…Owning a home means owning part of a neighborhood, and a homeowner’s feelings of commitment to the home can arouse feelings of commitment to the neighborhood, which, in turn, can produce interactions with neighbors.”

Bottom Line

There are many benefits to homeownership. That is why it is still a critical piece of the American Dream.

Posted by The KCM Crew

The Impact of Homeownership on Educational Achievement

The National Association of Realtors recently released a study titled ‘Social Benefits of Homeownership and Stable Housing.’ The study confirmed a long-standing belief of most Americans:

“Owning a home embodies the promise of individual autonomy and is the aspiration of most American households. Homeownership allows households to accumulate wealth and social status, and is the basis for a number of positive social, economic, family and civic outcomes.”

Today, we want to cover the section of the report that quoted several studies concentrating on the impact homeownership has on educational achievement. Here are some of the major findings on this issue revealed in the report:

  • The decision to stay in school by teenage students is higher for those raised by home-owning parents compared to those in renter households.
  • Parental homeownership in low-income neighborhoods has a positive impact on high school graduation.
  • Though homeownership raises educational outcomes for children, neighborhood stability may have further enhanced the positive outcome.
  • Children of homeowners tend to have higher levels of achievement in math and reading and fewer behavioral problems.
  • Educational opportunities are more prevalent in neighborhoods with high rates of homeownership and community involvement.
  • The average child of homeowners is significantly more likely to achieve a higher level of education and, thereby, a higher level of earnings.

Bottom Line

People often talk about the financial benefits of homeownership. As we can see, there are also social benefits of owning your own home.

*The next two Thursdays, we will report the study’s findings on the impact homeownership has on civic participation and a family’s health.

 

Posted by The KCM Crew

June is National Homeownership Month!

National Homeownership Month actually started as a week-long celebration of homeownership during the Clinton administration in 1995.

National Homeownership Month | KCM

In 2002, President George W. Bush proclaimed June as the National Homeownership Month. Here is an excerpt from his proclamation:

“Homeownership is an important part of the American Dream…A home provides shelter and a safe place where families can prosper and children can thrive. For many Americans, their home is an important financial investment, and it can be a source of great personal pride and an important part of community stability.”

“Homeownership encourages personal responsibility and the values necessary for strong families. Where homeownership flourishes, neighborhoods are more stable, residents are more civic-minded, schools are better, and crime rates decline.”

“During National Homeownership Month, I encourage all Americans to learn more about financial management and to explore homeownership opportunities in their communities. By taking this important step, individuals and families help safeguard their financial futures and contribute to the strength of our Nation.”

If you are one of the many renters out there who would like to make the transition from renter to homeowner, contact a local real estate professional who can help evaluate your ability to do so.

Originally published on Keeping Current Matters.

Dear College Grads: Start Saving for Your Dream House Now (and Other Unsolicited Advice for Your Future)

Congratulations, new grads: You’re free! After four long years at college, it’s time to move on to the next stage of your life: adulthood.

Image Source/Getty Images. Ireneusz Skorupa/iStock

Image Source/Getty Images. Ireneusz Skorupa/iStock

That means you get to start thinking about exciting things like your first job, a 401(k), and—sexiest of all—homeownership. And while you might still be sleeping off those Jell-O shots from last night, it’s time to wake up, chug some water, and start preparing yourself financially—if buying a house happens to be one of your long-term goals.

Start preparing now, and buying a house won’t be a struggle. “If you make good money, you have a clean credit rating, and you’ve got enough money set aside for the down payment, buying a house is not really a big hassle,” says Stewart Koesten, the chief executive and executive chairman of KHC Wealth Management in Overland Park, KS.

Sounds easy, right? Make money, save money, have good credit. Ta-da, a house! Not so much: Getting your finances in order for homeownership can be a challenge, even if your goal isn’t a luxury mansion. Here are seven ways to start achieving those goals right now.

1. Get your credit score in order

Sure, your mailbox may be overflowing with credit card offers and the idea of “paying the bills” still seems a bit confusing, but now’s the time to start getting your credit score in shape. One simple way to start building a history: Get your first credit card, because the credit bureaus consider the average age of your accounts when evaluating your score—and you’ll want a great score when it’s time to buy a house.

But if you have a history of overspending, this may not be the right solution for you. A long credit history with a high balance and poor on-time payment record will do moredamage. One option might be a secured credit card, which is backed by a cash deposit that’s usually equivalent to your limit. That way, you can never spend more than what you have available.

“There’s not too much difference between a good and a great credit score, in terms of buying a home,” Koesten says. The maximum score is 850, but once you get above 700, the only major advantage a better score will get you is a few points difference on your interest rate. “A bad credit score will hurt you. If you have a credit card or debts you didn’t honor, and you messed up your credit in the process, it will be detrimental to the whole process,” he says.

If you have student loans, a credit card may not be necessary. They also contribute to your score, so focus on paying them down regularly (and on time) to improve your rating.

2. Consider jobs with homeownership in mind

It might be a little too late to change your major, and we’d never suggest passing up your dream job just for money. But if you’re still evaluating your career path (i.e., you really have no idea what you want to or can do for the rest of your life) and homeownership is your dream, make sure to keep finances in mind when you’re searching.

It’s not just about the salary: Does the company match your 401(k) contributions? That will save you tens of thousands of dollars down the line. Are there career opportunities in the cities where you’d like to eventually purchase a home? Everyone should do what they love—but first, make sure that the career you crave is aligned with the lifestyle you dream of.

The easiest way to start saving is to smart small: Put away $10 a week, or use an app like Digit or Acorns to invest your small change.

3. Pay off that debt

If you’re like most young Americans, you’ll be coming out of college with a mound of debt. (The national average for a 2015 grad is $35,000!) It’s easy to ignore it, but balancing a mortgage and your student debt payments is a big burden, even with a generous salary.

Make paying off your debt your No. 1 priority, even if it means sacrificing other goals in the short term. For instance, if you have the opportunity to live at home while working for a few years, do it! (Seriously, we’re not judging—just know what you’re getting yourself into.) Or give up smaller pleasures, like Starbucks and gym membership, until you’ve paid down your debt. Short-term independence is a worthy sacrifice for long-term freedom. Plus, making regular payments will help improve your credit score.

If you’ve graduated college with credit card debt, make that the priority: The super-high-interest rates that come with most student credit cards can make them a crippling financial burden for years to come.

4. Decide what kind of home you want

You’re young—it’s OK if you don’t know a ranch home from a Colonial. (Unless you were an architecture or urban planning major, in which case, uh, maybe brush up on Design 101 before graduation.) But you should start thinking about where you want to live and how you want your future lifestyle to look. Would you feel lost without a yard? Or are you more of a city person, dreaming of a pristine rowhouse?

Even if you’re just looking to buy a starter home or studio apartment and save the dream home for your future, it’s important to keep in mind how you’d like to live.

First, make sure your financial future matches up with your ideal location.

“If you have a modest income in an area that requires higher incomes to live well, you have to adjust your expectations and live where you can afford,” Koesten says. “Don’t try to be too aggressive with your finances.”

Don’t worry if you haven’t mapped out all of the specifics yet. Even a general idea of your goals can help you develop a financial plan that meets your future needs.

5. Start saving your money

No one’s surprised that homes are expensive—you can see the price right there on the listing! Your dream home might cost more than four years’ tuition, but you just need to save up for the down payment, right?

Not so fast. What can be surprising is how much is due upfront: In addition to your down payment, you’ll have to pay for a home inspector, any relevant taxes, and a bevy of closing costs. Together, they can add up to 5% (or more) of the home’s price.

“Make sure you have sufficient reserves, so when you do eventually buy a home you’re not tapping all your resources,” Koesten says. “You want enough money left over after you buy the home to give yourself a little cushion.”

Sure, it seems like a lot of money—it is a lot of money!—but the sooner you start socking money away, the sooner you’ll be able to start looking for your dream home.

6. Don’t play games with your savings

Don’t treat the housing market like a casino and gamble with your future home.

As tempting as it might be, dumping your home savings into the stock market willy-nilly could lead to major trouble if there’s an upset right before you’re looking to buy. Either hire a financial adviser or stick to high-interest savings accounts and CDs.

“You want to make sure that in 10 years, the money you’ve saved has a high probability of being there,” Koesten says.

7. Don’t fall for lifestyle inflation

It’s fun to make money: More nights on the town! A bigger apartment! You can finally get a dog!

Rein in your impulses, and never change your lifestyle because of your salary. A big jump in income is a huge temptation to spend more on eating out or entertainment or weekly happy hours, especially if you’ve been living on a college student budget.

Our advice? Ignore the impulse. The No. 1 way to throw off your financial goals is to fall prey to lifestyle inflation. Raises and bonuses serve you best tucked away in your savings—even if that’s not as much fun.

8. Start small

Your first home doesn’t have to be your forever home. You may love the idea of a white picket fence and multiacre lawn—but it’s OK to start saving with a smaller home or apartment in mind. If you’re planning on staying in one place, purchasing a modest house or studio apartment can be an excellent beginner home. Don’t feel bad if you can’t afford your dream home off the bat: You’ve got many years left to save.

So, are you ready to get out there and start saving for a house now? We sure hope so. After all, you’re not getting any younger.

Published by Jamie Wiebe on realtor.com.