Bring Your Own Septic Tank: A Tiny House With Big Possibilities in Washington

Set on almost 6 acres of wooded land, this house sticks out like a needle in a proverbial haystack.

The property has enough space to build a 20,000-square-foot hunting lodge—but why bother when a 200-square-foot home will suffice?

What sets this tiny home apart from the miniature pack is its location. Perched near the popular Lake Riley in Arlington, WA, it is the perfect spot for weekend campers, a sweet vacation home, or a year-round residence, according to listing agent Kay Gailey. The home is available for $100,000.

“That’s what’s nice about it—you can enjoy [the outdoors] and you don’t have to worry about anyone building near you,” Gailey says.

The scenery is spectacular: The property is filled with evergreen trees and has a trail leading to a pond and creek. Wildlife in the area include birds, deer, raccoons, and possibly a bear or two.

Though it’s tiny, the home doesn’t sacrifice comfort. The second floor fits a queen-size bed, and a skylight opens the bedroom to the night sky.

On the first floor is a small kitchen with a half-size refrigerator and a narrow oven. There’s also a small living room, which opens to a walkout porch.

While this house has central heating, electricity, and well water, there is a caveat: There’s only one bathroom—and no sewage system.

The home is outfitted with a composting toilet, so you might want to bring your own septic tank. The original owner, who built the home in 2008, installed a portable septic system beneath the home (the home is raised off the ground). However, he took it with him when he sold the home in 2010 to its current owner.

The current owner, whose grandkids use the home as a vacation and camping spot, has decided to sell it without a septic tank, Gailey says.

If you’re down to compost, the area has all the hallmarks of a worthwhile camping ground. During the day, you can drive a mile over to Lake Riley for boating, fishing, and other outdoor activities. At night, there’s a fire pit and a seating area. You can also hit downtown Arlington in 15 minutes if you want to head back to civilization.

Gailey says the absence of a septic system means a cash deal might be the only option. She’s looking for banks that would be willing to do a deal with at least 20% down, but it might be a long shot.

“You basically need cash to buy it, otherwise I could be selling this place all day long,” Gailey says.

The home is attracting attention from a range of people with different plans, she says. There’s a young couple interested in getting back to nature and living there year-round. On the opposite end of the spectrum there’s an older couple who would like to use it as a part-time home. Others are looking to take the tiny house elsewhere (yep, it’s portable!) and build another home on the property.

So while the house is tiny, it comes with big possibilities.

“It’s a cute little thing. It makes me want to downsize my stuff,” Gailey says.

Published by Craig Donofrio on realtor.com.

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A Boulder House With Petroglyphs

One fireplace has scorch marks from ancient encampments.

Published by Melissa Allison on Zillow Blog.

It’s easy to see why the Fort McDowell Yavapai nation of Native Americans bought this house in Scottsdale, AZ.

The stone walls bear ancient petroglyphs, including rare sculptural forms, and create sacred spaces where sunlight plays during equinoxes.

A couple from the Northwest built the home in the early 1980s — if “build” is the word for pouring concrete among Precambrian granite boulders and cutting windows to fit the unusual contours of weathered stone.

They lived there more than two decades, then sold it in the mid-2000s to the Fort McDowell Yavapai nation, which expected to use it as a retreat center but found it was too far from their community. It’s now on the market for $4.2 million.

Looking at the pile of boulders, it’s hard at first to pick out the 5-bedroom, 2.5-bath home among them.

It sits on 9 acres in the Sonoran Desert and includes amenities that prehistoric people would have enjoyed — fireplaces and mountain views — plus some they would not, such as double ovens, a super-wide stainless steel refrigerator and a master suite with a combined deep tub and shower.

The guest room has a private patio entrance and a natural fireplace with scorch marks believed to have been left by Native American encampments.

These boulder formations also created the landscape of the famous Boulders Resort & Spa nearby, said Preston Westmoreland, the listing agent with Russ Lyon Sotheby’s International Realty.

Glass House in Missoula

The owner often sees red-tailed hawks, blue herons and bald eagles from inside this long, thin home with views in all directions.

More than once, Stuart Goldberg has jumped up from dinner to grab his fly-fishing rod and run out the door.

From his table, he can see the fish rising, and because he installed a 9-foot door to allow for the smooth egress of fly rods, he’s able to race down to the river on short notice.

Missoula, MT  is “A River Runs Through It” territory, something Goldberg and his wife, Mindy, took seriously in building a glass house from which they’re regularly enthralled by all sorts of natural phenomena. They’re within the city limits — two miles from Big Sky High School and a grocery store, able to have sushi delivered to their door — but with an outdoorsy lifestyle.

“It’s the house that wants you to look outside,” Goldberg says. “It makes me pause when I walk down the hallway and get a glimpse of sunlight off the river or see red-tailed hawks or catch sight of resident blue herons feeding down on the river bottom.”

The Goldbergs have listed the house for $6.5 million, which includes 71 acres, plus 50-percent interest in 78 acres next door.

The long, thin home has 4 bedrooms and 4 baths, with views of the Bitterroot River, national forests and recreation areas.

Whitetail deer regularly give birth to fawns within 50 feet of the house, because they know coyotes and other predators will not come that close.

“I have a photo of a bald eagle that dropped a fish on my driveway, then sat on a tree for four or five hours figuring out how to pick up the fish without running into my car. I moved the car, and he picked up the fish and flew away,” Goldberg recalls.

He and his wife built the home in 2011 on the site of an old dairy founded by Michael McCauley, an early settler of the area who convinced the military to build Fort Missoula nearby. The fort became an internment camp during World War II, and today it’s a historical museum.

Goldberg bought the property after seeing it with a real estate agent who took him and his business partner to the top of nearby McCauley Butte to show them what an incredible view a house would have from there. “We drove down the mountain and said, ‘We can’t let that happen,’” he says.

He, his business partner and a business owned by Goldberg and his father bought the property and an adjoining 140 acres. They developed 19 acres of it to raise enough money to put the remaining acreage into conservation. Only two homes are allowed to be built on the property, including the glass house. The rest of the property is now being sold separately.

Because of the land’s conservation status and the protected national lands around it, Goldberg says, “you could get on a horse outside the front door of our property and ride the horse across the river — which you can do at some times of the year — and basically ride that horse through public land until you got to Oregon.”

The listing agent is Keith Lenard of Hall & Hall Partners.

This article was published by Melissa Allison on Zillow Blog.

Radically Sustainable Earthship in Taos Lists for $249,000

If you’d like to reduce your footprint on the planet, we found a home that checks every box.

from realtor.com

from realtor.com

from realtor.com

from realtor.com

Located on 20 acres in the high New Mexico desert region outside Taos, this home designed by Earthship is now on the market for $249,000.

So … what is an Earthship?

Their site touts their designs as “The Ultimate in Green Buildings”, and they adhere to six design principles that allow any house they design to “provide electricity, potable water, contained sewage treatment and sustainable food production” under the same roof.

The exterior of this particular home is built from massive rammed earth construction and uses dirt-filled tires in the walls and some straw-bale construction on the interior walls.

from realtor.com

from realtor.com

from realtor.com

from realtor.com

Listing agent Ellen Lerner says these homes are a true lifestyle choice: “A buyer would typically be someone who wants to live off-the-grid. A person who wants to leave no carbon footprint.”

The home is able to remain off the grid thanks to solar panels that soak up the sun’s rays.

from realtor.com

from realtor.com

“The high desert does get cold at night, but we get about 300 sunny days a year,” Lerner notes. “It’s great for passive solar.”

Any unused power generated by the home’s solar panels is stored in an array of batteries.

As for the interior of this sustainable dwelling, it’s about 2,200 square feet inside with three bedrooms and a bathroom. It also comes with a barn and workshop which would be perfect for artists, farmers, or tinkerers.

The sizable indoor greenhouse adds to the green vibe of the home, and the surroundings of pristine desert beauty only enhance the bond that the home has with nature.

“The home feels really solid and feels as though it’s part of the earth,” Lerner says. “It’s a little hard to put into words, but you feel as though the home is a living organism.”

from realtor.com

from realtor.com

from realtor.com

from realtor.com

from realtor.com

from realtor.com

She adds any buyer will likely enter a “symbiotic relationship” with the home and not treat it as simply a roof with a few rooms. And although being off-the-grid may seem daunting, the agent debunked any ideas of the home or lifestyle that accompanies it being tough.

from realtor.com

from realtor.com

“It’s not difficult or fussy at all,” Lerner notes. “You’re not sacrificing anything to live in this home.”

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While the home is roughly 30 minutes from Taos, she also says the home doesn’t feel totally remote: a desert dweller will naturally learn to slow down and embrace the distance from civilization.

“It truly depends on one’s sense of space and time,” Lerner emphasizes. “It can take you 30 minutes to go four blocks in traffic in a big city. Wouldn’t you rather spend that time in a peaceful way?”

If the answer is yes, your Earthship has landed in Taos.

from realtor.com

from realtor.com

This article was originally published by   on realtor.com. See the original article here.

Sprawling Iowa Mansion Truly One of a Kind at $4.9M

What do you get when you purchase “the most expensive residential listing in Iowa“? We know houses are often called “one of a kind”—but in this case, the label truly fits.

Photo courtesy Jake Boyd

Photo courtesy Jake Boyd

Listing agent Heather Starr filled us in on this amazing custom home in Urbandale, IA, asking $4.9M.

Photo courtesy Jake Boyd

Photo courtesy Jake Boyd

“When I sell other expensive homes, I see a bathroom that’s like something I might have in my home,” Starr said. “Or I’ll see a closet that resembles mine. But in this house, there are no ‘normal’ rooms. Everything is unique and over the top.”

Photo courtesy Jake Boyd

Photo courtesy Jake Boyd

Dismiss her words as hyperbole at your peril. With almost 9,000 square feet of living area set on six-plus acres, this home has space to spare.

However, it’s really the features, location, and layout that set this home apart.

Photo courtesy Jake Boyd

Photo courtesy Jake Boyd

Photo courtesy Jake Boyd

Photo courtesy Jake Boyd

Photo courtesy Jake Boyd

Photo courtesy Jake Boyd

Inside you’ll find a multi-story interior greenhouse, an amazing built-in aquarium, an indoor waterfall, custom-built furnishings that stay with the home, and your very own private pond out back to boot.

Photo courtesy Jake Boyd

Photo courtesy Jake Boyd

Photo courtesy Jake Boyd

Photo courtesy Jake Boyd

“It’s the kind of house that deserves a name of its own,” Starr observed. “This home is inspired by nature. The owner’s love of nature is apparent throughout.”

Photo courtesy Jake Boyd

Photo courtesy Jake Boyd

Photo courtesy Jake Boyd

Photo courtesy Jake Boyd

“You feel like you’re in the trees,” she added. “You’re just minutes from Des Moines, but the feeling of seclusion you get in this home is amazing. All you hear are the birds and all you see are the trees.”

Photo courtesy Jake Boyd

Photo courtesy Jake Boyd

The back of the house overlooks the private pond, while the deck provides a view of the surrounding forest. Every room offers a view of the outside, either of the water or of the trees. The extensive use of wood throughout the home helps to reinforce the natural feeling.

Photo courtesy Jake Boyd

Photo courtesy Jake Boyd

Photo courtesy Jake Boyd

Photo courtesy Jake Boyd

While the pool of buyers at the multimillion-dollar price point in Iowa may be limited, this fabulous home should attract the attention of buyers from coast to coast. When it sells, Starr noted it will go down as the second-highest sale price for a home in Iowa.

And what multimillionaire could possibly resist the allure of how Starr summed up the view?

“When you stand on the deck and look out, everything you see belongs to you.”

Photo courtesy Jake Boyd

Photo courtesy Jake Boyd

Photo courtesy Jake Boyd

Photo courtesy Jake Boyd

Photo courtesy Jake Boyd

Photo courtesy Jake Boyd

All photos taken by Jake Boyd.

This article was originally published by  on realtor.com. See more photos and the original article here.

10 beautiful homes in the middle of nowhere

A home is a retreat — a place to escape the outside world, to be alone, to recharge, to relax with friends. For some, one apartment among many in a building wedged into a sea of other buildings provides all the sanctuary they need. But for others, true escape means getting as far away as possible from the rest of the world, to a beautiful and remote residence in a stunning location — with nobody around for miles.

© precisioncraft.com; homesbro

© precisioncraft.com; homesbro

Such retreats try very hard not to be found, but we’ve hunted down a few of them for your voyeuristic pleasure, searching high, low, and far to find a collection of lovely, unusual, and isolated homes that truly stand alone. (Just don’t go knocking on their doors.)

Floating house, Ontario, Canada

© beautiful-houses1.blogspot.com

© beautiful-houses1.blogspot.com

Being stranded in the middle of nowhere is just fine when your floating lake house comes equipped with a sauna and breathtaking views. A built-in boat dock ensures quick and easy departures and arrivals via water in warmer months.

Castel Meur, Plougrescant, Bretagne, France

© panoramio.com

© panoramio.com

If good fences make good neighbors, granite boulders make the best. Squeezed between two large rock formations, this home on the northern coast of France was built in 1861. The unusual location was well planned — the stones protect the house from strong sea winds.

Prefab home, Utah

© stillwaterdwellings.com

© stillwaterdwellings.com

Construction in a remote location can be cumbersome and expensive — which makes prefab a great choice for anyone seeking an escape from it all. The prefab home seen here was modified by the clients to suit their needs and took just 10 days to erect.

Island home, Vestmannaeyjar Archipelago, Iceland

© amusingplanet.com

© amusingplanet.com

This home — actually, a hunting lodge — sits on an island in the remote Vestmannaeyjar archipelago off the south coast of Iceland. Despite the isolated location, in true Icelandic style, it’s equipped with a sauna.

Log cabin, Idaho

© precisioncraft.com

© precisioncraft.com

The owner of this log cabin sought out rustic materials and an architectural plan that would yield a home befitting its picturesque mountain surroundings. The result? A traditional yet grand handcrafted log cabin that seamlessly blends with the landscape.

 

Lake home, Pedro Bay, Alaska

© alaskacoastalrealty.idxco.com

© alaskacoastalrealty.idxco.com

This is a view worth working for — and they did! The construction of this sprawling 4,400-square-foot home required that 380,000 pounds of materials be barged and flown in to its remote 40-acre location. The 5-bedroom home’s covered decks ensure that visitors can take in the spectacular views year-round.

Artist’s studio, Fogo Island, Canada

© saunders.no

© saunders.no

Seeming to defy gravity, this artist’s studio balances precariously on a rocky hill of Fogo Island in Newfoundland, Canada. Floor-to-ceiling windows make the most of the location, capturing views that we’re certain inspire the artist working inside.

Rustic eco house, Czech Republic

© inhabitat.com

© inhabitat.com

A preexisting barn at the site was dismantled and used in the construction of this energy-efficient home in the Czech countryside. Made entirely of recycled materials, the residence makes use of an on-site sewage system and freshwater well. Eventually, the home will depend solely on solar energy.

Jarson Residence, Paradise Valley, Arizona

© homesbro.com

© homesbro.com

The Jarson Residence stands out in its desert surroundings, but the generous use of windows in the house’s envelope lets the inhabitants feel as though they are living right among the rocks and cacti. The weathered steel and copper exterior helps the modern facade fit in with its environment.

© morerava.com

© morerava.com

Here’s a chance for you to try out remote living for yourself: Rent out a cabin at Cabañas Morerava on Easter Island. The architects thoughtfully considered the surrounding landscape in the cabins’ prefab design and went to great efforts to make as little impact as possible on the wild terrain.

This article was originally published by By Sara Carpenter of BobVila.com on MSN Real Estate. See the original article here.

Natural Swimming Pools: More Beauty, No Chemicals