5 Home Design Trends for 2018 (and 3 Fads That Need to Go )

Thought that all-white kitchen was timeless? Think again.

Home design trends come and go — and in 2018, one look that’s on its way out could actually cause your home to sell for less.

Here’s a look at five design trends you’ll be seeing more of in 2018, and three it’s time to kiss goodbye (especially if one of your New Year’s resolutions is to sell your home).

Trending in 2018

Floral prints

Interior design experts predict floral prints in bold, contrasting colors will make a big comeback in 2018, particularly on large billowing fabrics, like drapery, as well as chairs and throw pillows.

Photo courtesy of DwellStudio via Instagram.

Statement floors

Forget statement walls — 2018 will be about statement floors. From bold colored geometric tiles to soft herringbone-style hardwoods, expect to see fab floors everywhere next year, especially in bathrooms and laundry rooms. They’re a great way to make a small room pop, without adding clutter.

Photo from Zillow listing.

Light wood cabinets

Homeowners are gravitating toward medium and light wood cabinets, particularly with flat fronts and clean lines. The warmth, texture and natural element wood cabinets add help make the space feel more inviting.

Photo from Zillow listing.

Warm neutrals

From warm reds to caramel browns to soft beige, moodier color palettes, both on walls and in artwork, will be popular in 2018.

Photo courtesy of Adam Ford (The Happy Tudor) via Instagram.

Matte metal hardware

What kind of drawer pulls and light fixtures do you want with those wood cabinets? Matte metal! Homeowners are moving away from shiny silver- or gold-accented kitchen hardware — they can make the space feel cold.

Photo from Zillow listing.

2017 fads to forget

All-white kitchens

This look has been popular for a while, but it’s on the way out, according to the Zillow Home Trend Forecast.

Expect to see more color in kitchens next year, especially if the homeowner is planning to sell. Zillow data shows homes with blue kitchens sell for $1,800 more than homes with white kitchens.

Adding color and texture in the kitchen can help make the space feel more inviting. “While homes with all-white kitchens can be beautiful in photos, they are hard to keep clean and they may sell for less money,” says Zillow home design expert Kerrie Kelly.

Beautiful kitchen having electrical automatic cooking gas and fruits, flowers kept on table

You’ll see designers and bloggers painting their kitchen islands navy blue or deep red (maybe even purple!) or using white countertops to contrast with medium or light wood cabinets.

Bar carts

While perfectly staged bar carts look beautiful, most people don’t use theirs every day. Instead, the carts take up space and collect dust.

But don’t get rid of your cart just yet! Experts predict a shift toward coffee carts, which can be equally trendy, but far more practical.

Succulents

Succulents are easy to care for and relatively affordable, but so many other vibrant indoor plant options are out there. Nobody’s saying to toss out your beloved Haworthia, but do consider incorporating other plant varieties into your home — perhaps a palm or hearty fiddle-leaf fig.

Haworthia Fasciata Sitting Near Window; Shutterstock ID 167096096; PO: Cat Overman; Job: blog post

 

Posted by Cat Overman on Zillow

5 Retro Decorating Trends That Deserve a Comeback

If you’ve been yearning for the return of the conversation pit, you’re not alone.

Some home decor looks are just too good to let go. The boldly colored kitchen cabinets of the ’50s are taking on a sophisticated modern look. The late ’80s country kitchen look is enjoying new life — minus the gingham frills and bonneted goose motif — in today’s farmhouse chic trend, and mid-century design has taken over the home furnishing offerings of retailers at every price point. Rattan furniture and velvet upholstery, both popular in the ’70s, are showing up in designer collections again.

Our pick for the decor trend  most deserving of a second chance? The brightly colored bathroom fixtures (and sometimes even matching tile) that became popular beginning in the 1930s, and evolved from cool pastels to the much-maligned avocado and harvest gold hues of the 1970s. We’re not seeing these offered new yet, but salvage stores are a great resource if you simply must have a mint green or bubble-gum pink sink for your bathroom renovation.

Photo from Zillow listing.

Here are some of the blast-from-the-past home decor looks designers are happy to have deja vu over.

’50s-style dens

We are loving the reemergence of the den or the basement as a gathering space. Instead of having family and friends centered around a 50-inch television in the living room, we’re seeing people move toward intimate areas like listening rooms for their favorite vinyls, or casual seating in the den with headphones and their iPads. This setup is more conducive for connecting and catching up, or simply taking time for one’s self — think wood paneling, updated and re-imagined bean bags in designer fabrics, and high-quality retro audio sound.

– Kerrie Kelly, Kerrie Kelly Design Lab

Photo by Brian Kellogg.

Macrame textile art

Macrame from the ’60s and ’70s, but with a whole new twist. I love the beautiful heavy knotted textile hangings as art, or the thin delicate hangings for room screens. [They can hold] hanging flower vases and even light fixtures. This time it’s all about texture with a Scandinavian vibe.

– Susan M. Jamieson, ASID, Bridget Beari Designs, Inc.

Big macrame on a white brick wall in bedroom; Shutterstock ID 671446057; PO: Cat Overman; Job: blog post

Conversation pits

We want big living rooms with circular, sunken conversation pits. They need custom built-in sofas, space-age floating fireplaces hanging in the middle, and plush shag carpeting deep enough to swallow your foot. Give us this dedicated zone for hanging out with friends and family, a space that isn’t centered around a TV screen. Give us bold colors and wild graphic patterns on pillows. And, most importantly, give us a live-in housekeeper, because those shag carpets are a nightmare to keep clean.

– Chris Stout-Hazard, ROGER+CHRIS

Photo from Zillow listing.

The home design trend from the past I’d love to see make a comeback is the conversation pit. Our technology age has created a digital life and physical separation. The classic conversation pit promotes togetherness and community. The conversational pit arrangement organically encourages people to face each other with comfortable deep seating. It also can be an advantage in design strategy, with a flexibility to promote a stylish streamlined modern feel or a casual bohemian aesthetic. Inspiring our clients to ditch the television and engage with family and friends is part of our design practice, creating space as experience.

– Elena Frampton, Frampton Co.

Timelessly practical kitchen features

Two of our favorite features making a comeback lately are banquette seating and library ladders, especially in the kitchen. A lot of our projects are in the city, where space is at a premium. Banquette seating works great in a tight space, plus it creates additional storage opportunities under the bench. Same goes for the ladder: It’s all about space. If you don’t have to haul out a clunky ladder to access everything out of reach, you can double your kitchen’s storage capacity with cabinets or shelves that go all the way up to the ceiling.

– Jeff Pelletier,  Board & Vellum

Photo from Zillow listing.

Brass hardware and fixtures

Used in smaller doses like pull handles and faucets with a more sleek and modern shape, [brass hardware and fixtures] can really up your design game in a cool classy way. My favorite bathroom look right now is dark navy cabinets with Carrera marble quartz counters, oversized white sinks, and printed cement floor tile incorporated with brass pull handles and faucets.

– Christina El Moussa, HGTV’s “Flip or Flop” and SuccessPath

Photo from Zillow listing.

 

Posted by Cat Overman on Zillow

Quirky New Trends in Real Estate

As the housing market continues to recover, a bevy of interesting trends have been emerging in the sector, affecting everything from buyer and seller behavior to design and everything in between.

Quirky New Trends in Real Estate

Try before you buy

Want to spend quality time in the home you’re interested in buying? Perhaps spend the night and check things out before putting a single penny down? Real estate agents are now letting some qualified, serious buyers do just that! And this unusual strategy, which can ultimately help buyers make an informed decision, is catching on in markets across the country.

Dogs are people, too

Builders aren’t just turning to upgrades and financial carrots to help offset rising buying costs. They’re also getting more creative with the “extras” by taking pet friendly to a new level. In fact, some high-end apartment buildings offer pet food-centered room service menus, and in New York City, MiMA development’s Dog City will even walk, groom and arrange play dates for residents’ dogs.

Make Me Move

In a market that’s as tight as this one, sellers know they have the upper hand. And they’re capitalizing on the momentum by listing their “fantasy” price — the price it would take to persuade them to sell — using Zillow’s Make Me Move® feature.

Boutique-style closets            

While you likely know that screened porches and outdoor living rooms continue to interest homeowners, you may not realize that master bedroom closets designed with a coveted, boutique-like feel — think illuminated rods, compartmentalized storage, shoe walls, vanity areas and other focal points — are also becoming a virtual must-have, according to architects and high-end home builders.

This article was originally published by Vera Gibbons on Zillow Blog. See the original article here